Salary Survey Results

The Nebraska Grain and Feed Association (NeGFA) has once again completed our comprehensive salary survey of mangers and employees working in Nebraska's grain and feed industry. 

In the 2017 survey, elevator and cooperative managers indicated that their top concern is finding and retaining a qualified work force. AFter all, employees are responsible for the careful hadnling of merchandise, equipment and customers. Let's face it/ Supporting managers adn employees with fair salaries, bonuses and other benefits that reward their loyality is the most important employee retention strategy. The trick for managers is offering the right slaray and compensation program that rewards this dedication and company loyalty. 

Happy Employees usually translates to happy customers.

 

2017 Salary & Benefits Survey of the grain and feed industry in Nebraska

The Nebraska Grain and Feed Association is constantly striving to meet the needs of our members. One such need that arose from members’ requests was a comprehensive salary and benefits survey, which was sent to all regular member headquarters.

The survey includes the following:

  • Company demographics and financial information (including gross grain sales volume, annual throughput, sales volume, total assets and debt, and total return on sales).
  •  Number of employees
  • General manager compensation (by the state, by total sales volume, and by area in the state)
  • Compensation (by the state as a whole) for branch manager, controller, commodity merchandiser, grain originator, bookkeeper, outside grain sales person, operations superintendent, elevator/plant employee, office employee, season office employee seasonal outside employee, truck driver, and other
  • Benefits (company-wide, state as a whole), retirement programs, holiday and vacation, special absences and sick leave information

Management Compensation

"How much do you pay your manager?"

This is a valid question. While farmer-directors are businessmen in their own right, they generally do not have a background in corporate officer compensation. As a steward of a company's assets, you would like to pay a manager as little as possible. But you don't want to hire an unqualified manager or lose your current manager to a higher paying business.

Such concerns make the determiniation fo their manager's salary one of the most difficult duties faced by a board of directors. Its not unsual that their may have to be a salary increase to attract new management talent. Or maybe your a company that is facing operation problems and find yourself in a position where you have to pay what seems to be an exorbiant salary for capable replacement. When in irony, the company doesn't have a lot of wiggle room. 

THese type of compensation problems lead a board to simply ignore the subject than address it head on. The solution - is a slary survey because they can offer insight. Surveys indicate the average but it should only be used for comparative purposes.