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Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations Publishes Expert Report on Residues in Feed

  • By: NEGFA
  • On: 11/04/2019 09:17:00
  • In: Feed
  • Comments: 0
The recent report from FAO addressed the unintended and unavoidable presence of residues of approved veterinary drugs in food of animal origin (milk, milk and eggs) resulting from carryover of veterinary drugs in feed. In 2018, a Codex Committee on Residues of Veterinary Drugs in Foods (CCRVDF) identified seven (7) risk management options). A report from the January 2019 meeting will be reported and reviewed at the next CCRVDF meeting in May 2020. 

Residues, when present in feed, could be transferred to meat, milk and eggs, and might pose a risk to public health and lead to possible trade disruption. Globally, animal feed manufacturers follow current good manufacturing practices to reduce the risk of residues, however some instances of residues are unintended and unavoidable. A recent report addressed the unintended and unavoidable presence of residues of approved veterinary drugs in food of animal origin (milk, milk and eggs) resulting from carryover of veterinary drugs in feed.

The report highlights the importance of producing safe feed to reduce and preventing food safety hazards from veterinary drug carryover. In 2018, the Codex Committee on Residues of Veterinary Drugs in Foods (CCRVDF) requested advice from the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the World Health Organization (WHO) on this topic. The result of that advice identified seven risk management options:

  1. Increase awareness and provide easily accessible information about possible implications for carryover from the use of authorised veterinary drugs, as part of a structured training program for all competent authorities, professionals and workers.
  2. Strengthen national capacities for implementation of the Codex Code of Practice on Good Animal Feeding and related measures for animal feed production.
  3. Emphasize that when possible, dedicated and separate lines for manufacturing medicated feed should be considered. However, the experts recognize that there may be practical limitations related to construction and maintenance of separate lines in feed mills.
  4. Direct prescribers and users of medicated feed to consider the appropriate selection of authorised drugs (including active ingredient, formulation and galenic form) to achieve expected therapeutic outcomes while considering carryover implications.
  5. Emphasize monitoring and control of raw feed ingredients that have potential for transfer of veterinary drugs from feed to food (e.g. identification and selection of appropriate raw feed ingredients, avoidance of hazardous raw materials).
  6. Emphasize avoidance of the need to use medicated feed by implementing the use of animal health promoting practices and ingredients (e.g. good hygiene and husbandry practices, genetic selection, animal welfare, feed constituents, feed safety and adequate animal nutrition).
  7. Include specific advice in the Codex Code of Practice on Good Animal Feeding on HACCP-identified control points for carryover during transport from feed mill to farm.

The meeting, held in January 2019, brought experts together to review the causes of veterinary drug carryover in animal feed and the transfer from feed to food, as well as the known risks to human health and international trade, and suggest appropriate risk management strategies. The report from the meeting will be reported to CCRVDF at its next meeting in May 2020.

The American Feed Industry Association nominated Dr. Dragan Momcilovic, medicated feed specialist at the Food and Drug Administration's Center for Veterinary Medicine, to serve as an expert. Unfortunately, due to the U.S. government shutdown at the time, Dr. Momcilovic was unable to participate in the meeting. Dr. Gerald Shurson, from the University of Minnesota, attended the meeting as a resource for discussion.

(Source: AFIA  FeedGram Issue 22, November 1, 2019) Leah Wilkinson, Vice President of Public Policy and Education)


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